KATE, WHO TAMED THE WIND

Kate

If you’ve been watching Olympic figure skating, you know that skaters get judged on technical merit and artistic interpretation. And, as they’re skating, colored squares appear in the corner of the screen to show how well they executed the program’s required elements. A green box means the side-by-side triple axels …

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A behind-the-scenes look at WIDE-AWAKE BEAR. And, a GIVEAWAY.

Wide-Awake Bear

“What process do you follow to write your stories?” I’ve heard that question more frequently as I’ve sold more picture books, and I never quite know how to answer. The people asking usually look as if they’re waiting for a golden ticket to inspiration. Like, maybe I’ll say that I …

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Two books you should know by Dashka Slater

The Antlered Ship

Versatility is one of the characteristics I admire in other writers. It’s awesome when someone can do totally different genres or styles or voices equally well. If you appreciate this too, you’ll want to meet Dashka Slater. I first was introduced to Dashka’s picture books like DANGEROUSLY EVER AFTER, ESCARGOT …

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MARGARET AND THE MOON: A very nice nonfiction addition

Margaret and tte Moon

When the movie “Hidden Figures” came out last year, chronicling the roles three African-American women played in NASA during the space race, I liked it so much, I watched it twice. So, I was predisposed to like MARGARET AND THE MOON  (Alfred Knopf, 2017), a picture book written by Dean …

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Start school with Sally Derby’s A NEW SCHOOL YEAR

I know. I KNOW. It feels like summer vacation just started. You’ve barely cleaned out your kid’s backpack from this past year. You still have friends’ graduation parties to attend. You haven’t even taken a vacation. But the calendar does not lie, my friend. Now that July 4 has passed …

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DAD AND THE DINOSAUR dazzles — for readers and writers

Dad and the Dinosaur

Recurring elements are one of my favorite features in picture books. Picture books are shorter affairs, so the writer has to fit a plot into a tighter-than-normal space. To make the story hang together and feel like a coherent whole, there often are words, phrases or themes that repeat throughout …

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